SoundPimp audio enhancer guidelines for Linux

SoundPimp is a software surround technology that radically enhances the quality of computer audio. For a head-on impression of the incredibly realistic SoundPimp effects, we suggest that our audio enhancer demos serve better than a thousand words. And if SoundPimp has been installed on the computer, we also recommend the playlist material concurrently being created in Spotify or elsewhere, offering another head start introduction to SoundPimp benefits.

Linux Audio

In order to understand generally the audio system on Linux, we recommend this article:

Linux audio explained

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Install Java

Make sure Java is installed. For SoundPimp v1.6, use OpenJDK or the original Java version for Linux from Oracle. Make sure the correct 64bit or 32bit (x86) version is installed.

For later versions of SoundPimp, when such versions become available, it is probably best to use Oracle, unless an updated version of OpenJDK kan be found.

Install SoundPimp using Pulseaudio virtual device

From the SoundPimp dashboard, via the “tool” icon, select the audio driver “Java Audio Engine” for the following variant:  

It is possible to define a “virtual device” in Pulseaudio and set this device as system default for playback. Now this device can be selected as input audio device from the SoundPimp dashboard. Finally select whatever available output from the SoundPimp dashboard, be it a connected USB DAC, the built-in laptop speakers or whatever output device is available on the computer.

Please refer to Pulseaudio documentation for the proper setup of a virtual device.

Install SoundPimp using Jack

Alternative 1

Thanks to Bjorn Tveit for creating this tutorial.

Alternatively, select from the SoundPimp dasboard, via the “tool” icon, the “Jack direct connect” as the audio driver.

How to set up PulseAudio, JACK and SoundPimp to work together in Ubuntu 12.04 – 64bit
java version “1.6.0_24”

OpenJDK Runtime Environment (IcedTea6 1.11.5) (6b24-1.11.5-0ubuntu1~12.04.1)
OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.0-b12, mixed mode)

Install jack and qjackctl:
sudo apt-get install jackd qjackctl

Open limits.conf
sudo gedit /etc/security/limits.conf

and add these lines:
@audio – rtprio 99
@audio – memlock unlimited
@audio – nice -19

create a group called “audio” and make yourself a member of that group.
sudo groupadd audio
sudo adduser <user> audio

You need the PulseAudio utilities:
sudo aptitude install pulseaudio-utils pulseaudio-module-jack

And then run this to get PulseAudio connected to JACK:
pactl load-module module-jack-sink
pactl load-module module-jack-source

logout and relogin

run qjackctl
Press <start>
Go to Ubuntu’s sound preferences, and you’ll see “Jack sink” in the output tab
System Settings
Sound
Output: Jack sink

In JACK Control, you can create a script for the above and have it set up in “Execute script after Startup”. Then, PulseAudio will automatically load the JACK sink when you start JACK.

Install “Patchage” from Ubuntu Software Center to get a GUI

Now SoundPimp:

Download SoundPimp.jar

SoundPimp wants to put an Icon in the System Tray, which is not default enabled in Ubuntu 12.04

to enable in Ubuntu Unity
Install “dconf Editor” from Ubuntu Software Center
Next, hit the Alt+F2 key combination and start the dconf-editor
Navigate to desktop-unity-panel
change to: “systray-whitelist” [‘all’]

to enable in Gnome-Classic
Alt + Right-click the gnome-panel
Add to Panel
“Notificaton Area”
or “Indicator Applet complete”

Doubleclick the .jar to start in Java or:
java -jar ./SoundPimp-v16-lin-beta1.jar

I got the following error message:
“Unable to load library ‘jack’: libjack.so”

In my installation ‘jack’ is situated in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu
and is named libjack.so.0.1.0, while Soundpimp looks for libjack.so.
I made a link libjack.so in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu:
sudo ln -s libjack.so.0.1.0 libjack.so

And then Soundpimp appeared in Jack Connect diagram and in Patchage
Then connect PulseAudio JACK Sink to SoundPimp-Input

Next time you login:
Start QjackCtl
Hit Start
System Settings
Sound
Output: Jack sink
Start Soundpimp
$ java -jar ./SoundPimp.jar

in QjackCtl or in Patchage
connect PulseAudio JACK Sink to SoundPimp – Input

How to set up various multimedia players:
http://www.linuxmusicians.com/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=2507

Alternative 2

Thanks to Soeren Beye for creating this tutorial.

Do this: 

sudo aptitude install pulseaudio-utils pulseaudio-module-jack
sudo apt-get install jackd qjackctl
sudo gedit /etc/security/limits.conf
add:
@audio – rtprio 99
@audio – memlock unlimited
@audio – nice -19
sudo groupadd audio
sudo adduser <user> audio
relogin
pactl load-module module-jack-sink
pactl load-module module-jack-source

Now, select “Jack Direct Connect” in the SoundPimp dashboard, like this: 

SoundPimpJack

Now, go to Ubuntu’s sound preferences, and you’ll see “Jack sink” in the output tab
If you use JACK Control, you can create a script for the above and have it set up in “Execute script after Startup”. Then, PulseAudio will automatically load the JACK sink when you start JACK.

Finally setup the mandatory audio routing in Jack control panel. Please read the tutorials on jackaudio.org. However, you will understand the flavor of this in the tutorial for Mac OS X using Jack. See alternative 2 using the Jack Connection Manager (called Jack Control in Linux). The key point is that the audio stream output, normally coming from a media player, must be set as input to SoundPimp, and then the output of SoundPimp should be set to whatever output device, for example (for simplicity) the built-in speakers of the machine.

Also see these:

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1470407
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=806730
http://www.liberiangeek.net/2012/04/quickly-add-users-to-groups-in-ubuntu-12-04-precise-pangolin/

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One Comment

  1. Carl Henrik Carl Henrik
    Posted March 5, 2016 at 09:51 | Permalink

    If you have helpful remarks on how to install SoundPimp on Linux, please add them here. Thank you.

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